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Blogs and Articles — Taping

Low Back Pain - Erector Spinae Muscles

Posted by Arnold Fomo on

   Taping for Low Back Pain - Erector Spinae Trigger Points   Online Course - See Details   Erector Spinae Muscles Iliocostalis. Iliocostalis cervicis. Iliocostalis thoracis. Iliocostalis lumborum. Longissimus. Longissimus capitis. Longissimus cervicis. Longissimus thoracis. Spinalis. Spinalis capitis. Spinalis cervicis. Spinalis thoracis. The erector spinae, also called the sacrospinalis, comprise three sets of muscles organized in parallel columns. From lateral to medial, they are: iliocostalis, longissimus, and spinalis.   Erector Spinae Trigger Points   Origin Slips of muscle arising from the sacrum. Iliac crest. Spinous and transverse processes of vertebrae. Ribs. Insertion Ribs. Transverse and spinous processes of vertebrae. Occipital...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Gluteus Medius

Posted by Arnold Fomo on

  Stuart Hinds presents a technique for using tape to provide an off-loading effect when treating trigger points in Glute Med.   Taping for Trigger Points - CE/CPD Course   Gluteus Medius This muscle is mostly deep to and is therefore obscured by the gluteus maximus, but appears on the surface between the gluteus maximus and the TFL. During walking, this muscle, along with the gluteus minimus, prevents the pelvis fromdropping toward the non-weight-bearing leg. As with the gluteus maximus, trigger points in the gluteus medius may refer pain locally to the buttocks and hips, but are more commonly associated with lower back...

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Taping for Trigger Points - The Trapezius

Posted by Arnold Fomo on

   Treating Trigger Points in the Trapezius   Trigger Point Therapy - Where to Start?   Research supports the use of taping as a treatment aid in managing shoulder impingement problems Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common shoulder complaint in orthopedic clinics (44–65%) and the most frequent cause of shoulder pain in over-arm athletes. Many factors, such as trigger points, anatomic morphology, overuse, and instability of the glenohumeral joint, have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of the subacromial impingement. In addition, the role of the scapular controlling the impingement problems of the overarm athletes has aroused major interests after the Kibler’s...

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Taping for Trigger Points - Lower Back Pain

Posted by Arnold Fomo on

Taping for Lower Back Pain - Stuart Hinds Over 30 million Americans experience low-back pain at any given time! According to the report Global Burden of Disease (2010) lower back pain is the single leading cause of disability worldwide.  Back pain is one of the most common reasons for missed work and is the second most common reason for visits to the doctor’s office, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections.  Trigger points may be associated with the majority of cases of back pain, and for many years, Kinesiology tape has been used by therapists treating elite athletes in order to accelerate rehabilitation, and relieve...

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Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)

Posted by Arnold Fomo on

  Kinesiology Taping for Knee Pain - Patella tendonitis and Patella femoral pain    Patellofemoral syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by a group of symptoms that are easily diagnosed and often respond to simple management. The pain is typically located behind the kneecap and is usually felt during activities that require knee flexion and forceful contraction of the quadriceps (performing squats, going up and down stairs). The pain may get worse and last longer when the client continues to perform the aggravating activity. Clients may also report pain when sitting with their knee flexed for a long period of time, such as while watching a...

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