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Blogs and Articles — Hamstrings

Treating the Hamstring Muscles in Runners

Posted by Judith Winer on

  The Hamstring Muscles       Treating the Hamstrings - Stuart Hinds   Notes for the Video Above: Although it has become common to refer to the long muscles at the back of the thigh as the hamstring muscles or the hamstrings, they are in fact the the tendons that attach the large muscles at the back of the thigh to bone. The hamstring muscles themselves are the large muscles that pull on those tendons. Anatomists refer to these as the posterior thigh muscles, and more specifically as the semimembranosus, the semitendinosus, and the biceps femoris muscles. These muscles span...

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Trigger Point Treatment Techniques for the Hamstring Muscles

Posted by Judith Winer on

The Hamstring Muscles   The Biceps Femoris in More Detail  During running, the hamstrings slow down the leg at the end of its forward swing and prevents the trunk from flexing at the hip joint  Treating Trigger Points in Short Head Biceps Femoris - Stuart Hinds     The hamstrings consist of three muscles. From medial to lateral they are the semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris.  Origin Ischial tuberosity (sitting bone). Biceps femoris also originates from back of femur. Insertion Semimembranosus: back of medial condyle of tibia (upper side part of tibia). Semitendinosus: upper medial surface of shaft of tibia. Biceps femoris:...

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Treating Trigger Points in the Biceps Femoris

Posted by Judith Winer on

The Hamstring Muscles     Treating Trigger Points in Short Head Biceps Femoris - Stuart Hinds     During running, the hamstrings slow down the leg at the end of its forward swing and prevents the trunk from flexing at the hip joint    The hamstrings consist of three muscles. From medial to lateral they are the semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris.   Origin Ischial tuberosity (sitting bone). Biceps femoris also originates from back of femur. Insertion Semimembranosus: back of medial condyle of tibia (upper side part of tibia). Semitendinosus: upper medial surface of shaft of tibia. Biceps femoris: lateral side of head...

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Common Sports Injuries - Treating the Hamstrings

Posted by Judith Winer on

Hamstrings - Trigger Point Anatomy   Ultimately, the hamstrings are trying to be gluteal muscles, while the lumbar muscles are trying to be hamstrings The hamstrings eccentrically contract during gait in order to decelerate extension of the knee joint and hip flexion, while also playing a very important role in pelvic stability. The hamstring muscles decelerate internal rotation on heel-strike The hamstrings disappear under the gluteus maximus and provide force closure of the sacroiliac joint through the coupled action of the force provided by the contralateral latissimus dorsi. This force is transmitted through the sacrotuberous ligament and further up to the thoracolumbar...

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Trigger Point Therapy - Treating The Hamstrings

Posted by Judith Winer on

    The hamstrings are amongst the most overworked muscles in the body There's a common myth that hamstring injuries are the domain of athletes and don't generally affect the rest of us. The reality is that even standing upright requires continuous performance from these muscles, making them prone to develop active trigger points. This in turn may often lead to many other painful disorders, including lower-back, hip, thigh, and knee pain.   Muscle Imbalance  When one muscle group is much stronger than its opposing muscle group, the imbalance can lead to the development of trigger points, and eventually to the process whereby...

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