Learn more for less - join today!

Courses for Healthcare and Fitness Professionals

Currency

Language

 

Teres Minor Trigger Points - often associated with Rotator Cuff Injuries

 

The teres minor decelerates internal rotation of the shoulder joint

Inhibition in this muscle due to short/ spastic subscapularis, latissimus dorsi, teres major, and pectoralis major muscles sets up the ideal conditions for repetitive stress in sports, such as swimming and rugby, and in any activity involving acceleration through internal/external rotation and flexion/extension of the shoulder complex.

Numbness or tingling will be felt in the fourth and fifth digits of the same arm, as well as pain in the posterior shoulder at the greater tuberosity.

Teres minor myofascial trigger points are often sponsored by the subscapularis.

 

  Teres Minor Trigger Points

Teres Minor - Common Trigger Point Site

 

 

Anatomy

A member of the rotator cuff, which comprises the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis.

The rotator cuff helps hold the head of the humerus in contact with the glenoid cavity (fossa, socket) of the scapula during movements of the shoulder, thus helping to prevent dislocation of the joint.

Origin

Upper two-thirds of lateral border of dorsal surface of scapula.

Insertion

Lower facet on greater tubercle of humerus. Capsule of shoulder joint.

Action

As a rotator cuff muscle, helps prevent upward dislocation of shoulder joint. Laterally rotates humerus. Weakly adducts humerus.

Antagonists: subscapularis, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi.

Nerve

Axillary nerve, C5, 6, from posterior cord of brachial plexus.

Basic Functional Movement

Example: brushing hair back.

Indications

Shoulder pain (especially posterior), frozen shoulder syndrome, rotator cuff rehabilitation, subacromial bursitis, biceps tendonitis, shoulder pain at top outer section of shoulder blade near posterior deltoid, often associated with other shoulder problems (especially rotator cuff issues), numbness/tingling in 4th and 5th fingers.

Note: Trigger points in the teres minor muscle mainly cause a deep pain in the shoulder which can sometimes be misinterpreted as bursitis

Causes

Reaching above 90 degrees and/or reaching behind back, gripping steering wheel in RTA, holding heavy object for long time, computer/mouse, overuse syndromes.

Differential Diagnosis

C8–T1 radiculopathy. Rotator cuff tendinopathy. Shoulder–wrist–hand syndrome. Subacromial/deltoid bursitis. Shoulder impingement syndromes (painful arc). Acromioclavicular joint dysfunction.

Connections

Infraspinatus.

Trigger Point Treatment

 Spray and Stretch YES
Compression YES
Muscle Energy Techniques YES
Positional Release YES
Dry Needling YES

        

 

Top Related Videos Because You Liked: Teres Minor

 

 Supraspinatus Trigger Point Release

  

 

 

 

  

 

Leave a comment

Please note: comments must be approved before they are published.

feel good learning
NAT global campus

Learn More for Less

Unlimited access to all courses for just $19.95/mo

Save on Top Rehab Tech

Scraping, a manual, ancient practice where pain points are worked with a gua sha (smooth-edged tool), reportedly increases blood flow by up to 400 per cent more than foam rolling and massage guns. By breaking up old, damaged blood vessels to promote new growth and healing, these tools are useful for getting into the nooks and crannies of a pain point, especially in delicate areas like along the shin muscles and under the foot.

Tim Tian has taken the scraper idea and supercharged it, creating a manual, triangular tool that blends heat and vibration therapy. “Cold blades stiffen muscles, blocking a deep release,” he says.

The heated scraper device takes just three seconds to reach 50ºC. This helps muscles soften, making it easier to massage away tension, increase blood flow and promote healing. The scraper is specially great for alleviating delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the quads, and provides a relaxing switch-up from the foam roller slog.