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Know your shoulder anatomy!  

  

Simple Shoulder Stretches

Here are 5 other shoulder stretches that we regularly recommend ...

1. Great for trigger points in the "Pecs"!

Technique

Kneel on the floor in front of a chair or table and interlock your forearms above your head. Place your arms on the object and lower your upper body toward the ground.

Muscles that you're stretching

Primary muscles: Pectoralis major and minor. Anterior deltoid.
Secondary muscles: Serratus anterior. Teres major.

Injury where this may help dissipate trigger points

Impingement syndrome. Rotator cuff tendonitis. Shoulder bursitis. Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis). Chest strain. Pectoral muscle insertion inflammation.

Note

Keep your elbows bent and vary the width of your arms for a slightly different stretch.

2. We find this especially useful between trigger point therapy treatments for biceps.

Technique

Stand upright with your back towards a table or bench and place your hands on the edge of the table or bench. Slowly lower your entire body.

Muscles that you're stretching

Primary muscles: Anterior deltoid. Pectoralis major and minor.
Secondary muscles: Biceps brachii. Coracobrachialis.

Injury where this may help dissipate trigger points

Dislocation. Subluxation. Acromioclavicular separation. Sternoclavicular separation. Impingement syndrome. Rotator cuff tendonitis. Shoulder bursitis. Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis). Biceps tendon rupture.Bicepital tendonitis. Biceps strain. Chest strain. Pectoral muscle insertion inflammation.

Note

Use your legs to control the lowering of your body. Do not lower your body too quickly.

 

3. Stretching Infraspinatus may be important for injury prevention and can help dissipate trigger points

 

Technique

Stand with your arm out and your forearm pointing downwards at 90 degrees. Place a broomstick in your hand and behind your elbow. With your other hand pull the top of the broomstick forward.

Muscles that you're stretching

Primary muscle: Infraspinatus. Posterior deltoid.
Secondary muscle: Teres minor.

Injury where this may help dissipate trigger points

Dislocation. Subluxation. Acromioclavicular separation. Sternoclavicular separation. Impingement syndrome. Rotator cuff tendonitis. Shoulder bursitis. Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis).

Note

Many people are very tight in the rotator cuff muscles of the shoulder. Perform this stretch very slowly to start with and use extreme caution at all times.

4. Trigger Points in the Trapezius muscle are extremely common. This is a great stretch for trapezius that's easy to do at home.

 

Technique

Sit in a squatting position while facing a door edge or pole, then hold onto the door edge with one hand and lean backwards away from the door.

Muscles that you're stretching

Primary muscles: Trapezius. Rhomboids. Latissimus dorsi. Posterior deltoid.
Secondary muscle: Teres major.

Injury where this may help dissipate trigger points

Neck muscle strain. Whiplash (neck sprain). Cervical nerve stretch syndrome. Wry neck (acute torticollis). Upper back muscle strain. Upper back ligament sprain. Impingement syndrome. Rotator cuff tendonitis. Shoulder bursitis. Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis).

Note

Lean backwards and let the weight of your body do the stretching. Relax your upper back, allowing it to round out and your shoulder- blades to separate.

5. Trigger points in the anterior deltoid are often associated with "unexplained" shoulder pain. This stretch may quickly help relieve pain.

 

 

Technique

Stand upright and clasp your hands together behind your back. Slowly lift your hands upward.

Muscles that you're stretching

Primary muscle: Anterior deltoid.
Secondary muscles. Biceps brachii. Brachialis. Coracobrachialis.

Injury where this may help dissipate trigger points

Dislocation. Subluxation. Acromioclavicular separation. Sternoclavicular separation. Impingement syndrome. Rotator cuff tendonitis. Shoulder bursitis. Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis). Chest strain. Pectoral muscle insertion inflammation.

Note

Do not lean forward while lifting your hands upward.
 

This blog is intended to be used for information purposes only and is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or to substitute for a medical diagnosis and/or treatment rendered or prescribed by a physician or competent healthcare professional. This information is designed as educational material, but should not be taken as a recommendation for treatment of any particular person or patient. Always consult your physician if you think you need treatment or if you feel unwell. 

 

  

   

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