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Blogs and Articles — Gluteus Muscles

Trigger Point Therapy - Treating Gluteus Medius

Posted by Arnold Fomo on

  Stuart Hinds presents a technique for using tape to provide an off-loading effect when treating trigger points in Glute Med.   Taping for Trigger Points - CE/CPD Course   Gluteus Medius This muscle is mostly deep to and is therefore obscured by the gluteus maximus, but appears on the surface between the gluteus maximus and the TFL. During walking, this muscle, along with the gluteus minimus, prevents the pelvis fromdropping toward the non-weight-bearing leg. As with the gluteus maximus, trigger points in the gluteus medius may refer pain locally to the buttocks and hips, but are more commonly associated with lower back...

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Treating Gluteus Medius Trigger Points - Stretching

Posted by Arnold Fomo on

  Stretching Gluteus Medius - Dr. Jonathan Kuttner   Gluteus Medius This muscle is mostly deep to and is therefore obscured by the gluteus maximus, but appears on the surface between the gluteus maximus and the TFL. During walking, this muscle, along with the gluteus minimus, prevents the pelvis from dropping toward the non-weight-bearing leg. As with the gluteus maximus, trigger points in the gluteus medius may refer pain locally to the buttocks and hips, but are more commonly associated with lower back pain where they likely form part of the same wider holding pattern.   Gluteus Medius - Common Trigger Point Sites...

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Thoracolumbar Fascia and Its Relationship to the Gmax

Posted by John Gibbons on

The thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) is a thick, strong sheet of a ligamentous type of connective tissue, which connects with, and covers, the muscles of the trunk, hips, and shoulders. The normal function of the Gmax will be to exert a pulling action on the fascia, thereby tensing its lower end. You can see from the diagram below that there is a connection between the Gmax and the contralateral latissimus dorsi muscle by means of the posterior layer of the TLF. Both of these muscles conduct the forces contralaterally (i.e. to the opposite side) during the gait cycle (via the posterior...

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